Mental Health Awareness and Meditation


Every month has been made into a commemoration of some kind. May has quite a few national and international holidays ranging from National Brain Tumor Awareness Month to Celiac Awareness Month to Haitian Heritage Month to National Moving Month in the United States and National Smile Month in the United Kingdom. For a larger and more comprehensive list, please go here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May

I have chosen to share about National Mental Health Awareness Month.

In recent times, attitudes towards mental health issues appear to be changing. Negative attitudes and stigma associated with mental health have reduced and there has been growing acceptance towards mental health issues and support for people with them.

Despite this shift in attitude, the idea of a mental health awareness campaign is not a recent one. In the late 1940’s, the first National Mental Health Awareness Week was launched in the United States. During the 1960’s, this annual, weekly campaign was upgraded to a monthly one with May the designated month. During this month, National Health America, the main organization which sponsors this event, run a number of activities which are often based on a theme.

Mental illnesses can take many forms, just as physical illnesses do. Mental illnesses are still feared and misunderstood by many people, but the fear will disappear as people learn more about them. If you, or someone you know, has a mental illness, there is good news: all mental illnesses can be treated.

Did you know?:
-About 1 in 5 American adults will have a mental health condition in any given year?
-But only 41 percent of them will receive services?
-About 10 percent of the American adult population will have a mood disorder, such as depression or bipolar?
-And 18 percent have an anxiety disorder, including post-traumatic stress disorder?

Follow this link to see when you or someone you know should receive help. Remember, help isn’t something to be ashamed of!:
http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/conditions/finding-help-when-get-it-and-where-go

One of the breakthroughs in modern psychology and neuroscience has been showing that meditation reduces depression, anxiety, stress, phobias, addictions, and many other impairments to mental health. Plus, it feels good. Fraser Collins says: “It is estimated that we have around 50,000 – 80,000 thoughts a day and that around 70% – 90% of the thoughts we have are negative – thus creating huge levels of stress and anxiety. So the challenge is how we reduce these thoughts?”

The answer is meditation and mindfulness. If you are unfamiliar with how to meditate, please take a moment to read the cutoff below.

If you’d like company, there is a group in SL that is there for support. Visit the Landmark below for more resources and great people.
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Shanghai%20Mountains/126/134/1750

More info:

http://www.inspirationalmentalhealth.com/p/resources.html

http://www.whathealth.com/awareness/event/nationalmentalhealthmonth.html

http://www.cmha.ca/mental-health/understanding-mental-illness/

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/news/mental-health-awareness-week/

http://life.utoronto.ca/stories/build-on-your-strengths-mental-health-awareness-month/

http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/may

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2013/10/10/meditation-mental-illness-anxiety-depression_n_4076036.html

http://healthland.time.com/2013/08/07/does-meditation-help-or-hinder-mental-illnesses/

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